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    Stereo D Converts Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter to 3D
    Stereo D just wrapped up the conversion of director Timur Bekmambetov's Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter from 2D to 3D, and the job began before a single frame was shot.
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    from the Creative COW article:

    If you think that converting a motion picture from 2D to 3D is a post production process, think again. Stereo D just wrapped up the conversion of director Timur Bekmambetov's Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter from 2D to 3D, and the job began before a single frame was shot. "With our company, this is becoming fairly common," says Stereo D Head of Stereography Graham Clark. "We meet with the director, do script breakdowns. We've even done pre-greenlight work by doing proof of 3D concept on concept art."

    "We get involved very early in the process on most features, to develop the look of the movie," adds Stereo D Head of Post Production Milton Adamou. "That influences how we convert it and create a 3D version."

    Even so, Stereo D's close integration with the filmmakers and VFX houses throughout pre-production, production and post ranks Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter as an unusually close collaboration. "We first met with Timur at Fox Studios in Los Angeles and discussed the prospect of doing a conversion," says Clark. "We realized right away that Timur was very creative and wanted to explore digital 3D as a new language."

    During pre-production, the Stereo D team had the opportunity to explore creative options and highlight technical pitfalls with Bekmambetov and cinematographer Caleb Deschanel, ASC. Clark first met with Bekmambetov on set in New Orleans for a week. "When we started with Timur, we went into the topic of monocular depth cues to show what helps support stereo," Clark says. "Citizen Kane, for example, would be a good movie in 3D if converted because of the strong camera angles. When we convert the movie, stereo is a multiplier to monocular depth cue, which can include size, perspective, color, and atmospherics. What was interesting is that Timur latched onto that idea and he actually took it quite far and had us add more monocular depth cues, because we could add depth cues in post. It was something unexpected and very creative."

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